UA-8412995-1 The Southport Globe: Over 200 attend Aspetuck Land Trust Lecture Series at Pequot Library

Monday, August 26, 2013

Over 200 attend Aspetuck Land Trust Lecture Series at Pequot Library

FAIRFIELD, CT.  August 12, 2013 – Speaking to some 200 Aspetuck Land Trust members from Fairfield, Weston, Westport and Easton gathered at the Pequot Library, climate change activist author Bill McKibben reported on the risks and challenges within the global climate change public policy debate. McKibben warned that due to dangerous atmospheric carbon dioxide levels from dependence on fossil fuels, gradually rising global temperature, polar ice cap melt and mounting sea levels, conserving open space land alone would not be enough to protect “this gloriously beautiful world we’ve been given.”
Author and climate change activist Bill McKibben speaks to a packed audience of nearly 200 Aspetuck Land Trust members at the Pequot Library on August 9.
 
McKibben is the author of a dozen books about the environment beginning with “The End of Nature” in 1989, the first book for a general audience on climate change. It has been translated into more than twenty languages. Founder of the grassroots climate campaign 350.org and a frequent environmental rally coordinator, McKibben is also the Schumann Distinguished Scholar at Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vt.  His appearance Friday night marked the start of the land trust’s new Haskins Lecture Series honoring noted local scientists Caryl and Edna Haskins who bequeathed their Westport estate on Green Acre Lane to the Aspetuck Land Trust in 2002.  A portion of the estate was sold by the land trust to create an endowment to manage the grounds as a nature preserve and to support environmental education.
Author and climate change activist Bill McKibben speaks to a packed audience of nearly 200 Aspetuck Land Trust members at the Pequot Library on August 9.
 
A frequent contributor to The New York Times, The Atlantic Monthly, Harper's, Orion Magazine, Mother Jones, The New York Review of Books, Rolling Stone and Outside, McKibben also is a board member of the Adirondack Conservancy. McKibben said the most dismal development since “The End of Nature” was first published is “the inability of the American political system to take seriously our peril.” “A bipartisan effort to do nothing has been wildly successful,” according to McKibben.

From left, Aspetuck Land Trust executive committee members: Princie Falkenhagen, Easton, Lisa Brodlie, Weston, author Bill McKibben, Nancy Moon, Fairfield, Heather Williams, Westport, and Aspetuck Land Trust executive director David Brant from Fairfield.

The Aspetuck Land Trust (ALT) is a local non-profit land conservation organization founded in 1966 to preserve open space in the towns of Westport, Weston, Fairfield and Easton. ALT preserves provide passive recreation and educational opportunities for people to learn about and enjoy nature, while preserving the flora and fauna and rural characteristics of local communities. ALT maintains 44 trailed nature preserves and other conservation-only properties on over 1,700 acres of land. ALT has over 1,000 local members who support the organization through annual membership contributions.  For more information visit www.aspetucklandtrust.org

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